Discovering The Lost City of Petra

 

The story of the Lost City of Petra begins with the story of the Nabataeans, nomadic traders who eventually settled in Edomite territory around 2 B.C. The Nabataeans had traveled everywhere and picked up architectural ideas from the Persians, Greeks, and Romans, and adapted these ideas into something that was uniquely their own. We don’t have a lot of information about the Nabataeans because no self-written history has been found. My guest on today’s podcast, Jane Taylor, describes what we do know about the Nabataeans and their art style, culture, language, the extent of their kingdom, and why they were able to withstand the Romans.

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The Treasury at Night
The Treasury at Night

Petra is not the only Nabataean site – You may want to see Mada’in Saleh

Mada’in Saleh, also known as Hegra, in Saudi Arabia, is not as famous as Petra but is still a significant Nabataean site. Mada’in Saleh has a wealth of beautiful tombs carved into the sandstone mountains of the region. On this episode, Jane Taylor tells us about the history of The Lost City of Petra and also describes Mada’in Saleh and the excavations that are being done there, as well as describing some of the challenges for a woman traveling in Saudi Arabia.

Petra is much more than just the Treasury!
Petra is much more than just the Treasury!

Petra was much the same under Roman rule as it was in the reign of the Nabataeans

When the Romans took over the Nabataeans, life actually stayed much the same for the residents of Petra. On this episode, Jane Taylor explains the relationship between the Romans and the people of Petra, and how Petra flourished through the 6th Century. She then describes the gradual decline of Petra, mostly due to trade considerations. The Lost City of Petra has a fascinating history. You can learn about it on today’s episode of The History Fangirl.

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More tombs from Petra
More tombs from Petra

How was Petra lost and rediscovered?

During the early Crusader period, Petra was clearly regarded as an important center. But after the Crusaders, there is a gap in our knowledge, with no references to Petra from the 14th Century until Swiss explorer John Lewis Burckhardt rediscovered it in 1812. The story of Petra’s rediscovery and the international reaction to it is the subject of my interview with author Jane Taylor on this podcast episode. Listen in to hear about the rediscovery of Petra, stories of some of the early visitors to the site, and what it is like to travel there today.

 

What is it like to travel to Petra today?

Petra is Jane Taylor’s favorite place in the world. You have probably heard of the famous sandstone carved structure, The Treasury. But The Treasury is simply the foretaste of Petra itself. On this episode, listen to Jane describe what it is like to visit Petra, from the mind-blowing scale of the site to the stupendous view from the monastery, to how to negotiate the price of a camel ride. On my visit, I found the aggressive haggling with vendors to be quite a culture shock. Prepare yourself for an amazing trip by listening to Jane’s descriptions of her favorite places and why Petra is her favorite place in the world.

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There's lots of Indiana Jones merch at Petra
There’s lots of Indiana Jones merch at Petra

 

 Outline of This Episode

  • [0:14] Jane Taylor, author and photographer, writes about The Lost City of Petra.
  • [0:53] How Jane Taylor first became interested in Jordan.
  • [2:28] History of Petra from Edomite territory to the Nabataean Capital.
  • [4:55] Nabataean art style – a unique reflection of other cultures and styles.
  • [6:15] We have only limited history of the Nabataean people.
  • [7:36] Contemporaries of the Nabataeans provide clues to their culture.
  • [8:55] Nabataeans may have spoken one language and written another.
  • [10:39] The kingdom of the Nabataeans, from Damascus to Mada’in Saleh.
  • [12:01] Why the Nabataeans were able to hold out against the Romans.
  • [13:46] Petra is not the only Nabataean site – You may want to see Mada’in Saleh.
  • [15:44] How Jane Taylor ended up going to Petra.
  • [16:24] Petra was much the same under Roman Rule as it was in the reign of the Nabataeans
  • [18:52] Thanks to our sponsor, Audible, and a description of this week’s free book.
  • [20:31] How was Petra lost and rediscovered?
  • [22:30] What was the international reaction to his rediscovery of Petra?
  • [26:28] Jordan began to preserve Petra and make it a travel site after WWI.
  • [28:32] What is it like to travel to Petra today?
  • [33:45] Jane Taylor’s favorite place in Petra – The Monastery.
  • [35:27] Prepare yourself for haggling with street vendors.

Resources & People Mentioned

Petra at Night
Petra at Night

 

This Episode’s Giveaway

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Discovering the Lost City of Petra
Discovering the Lost City of Petra

4 Comments

  1. I’ve only heard a bit about this story but your post was very educational, Stephanie! When’s the best time of the year to go there?

  2. Pingback: The Lost City of Petra – PATRICK BRIGHAM LIVE – Patrick Brigham Live

  3. Hello! I started listening to your podcast, and got caught up just before the next episode drops (I hope). It’s certainly a fun podcast so far, and I plan to keep listening.

    One quick note: the link to this episode from your main page doesn’t work, as it tries to take us to the admin area.

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